Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Good things and bad things

Ever notice how you think something must be good and it turns out bad? Bonnie Plants sells their Tomato plants, peppers etc in peat pots which in itself is a great thing- you plant the plant in its pot in the ground and the pot composts itself, fertilizing the ground around the plant. Just throw away the little plastic collar around the pulp pot. BUT- Bonnie plants are in Alabama. I think unless you live in the south, this would make the carbon footprint of the plant something awful.
Now I am not faulting Bonnie plants at all. They have come up with an ingenious answer to an old problem- the plastic starter packs. And for that they deserve a truckload of credit. But it makes me wonder why other plant nurseries don't do the same thing. I have a hard time believing that the plastic starter pots are that much cheaper. And what about the disposal costs? But I suppose they don't have to throw them away so they don't pay disposal costs.
You can make these at home your self by starting plants using Diy starter pots or toilet paper tubes or even egg shells!

8 comments:

E said...

And then there is the downside of harvesting peat - not a sustainable operation, but rather mining a non-renewable resource.

ib mommy said...

Actually, they do throw the plastic pots and trays away. Some nursery operations just chuck their unsold inventory in the dumpster. We rescued several truckloads of spent pansies this spring, dumped them in the compost pile and donated the pots to the Master Gardeners.

Heather said...

I just bought some plants from Bonnie's Plants. Good information to know! I'm definitely going to try growing from just seeds next time using one of the cool ideas you suggested. Thanks!

Tara said...

When I do get plants in the plastic starter pots, I keep them and use them over and over to start seeds. I'm not a big fan of them, but at least they're getting used A LOT.

Abbie said...

There's a guy in CT who makes "poo pots" (or named something like that) out of cow manure from his farm. They're biodegradable and are fertilizer. He was even featured on the show "Dirty Jobs" and Mike Rowe helped him make some (I LOVE that show). I don't know if they sell around the rest of the country, but they're pretty hot in CT.

Abbie said...

OH, BTW- if you have plastic pots, or any pots for that matter, that you don't want but are in good condition, ask local school if they need a donation. I accept lots of things for my classroom's greenhouse, and hanging pots are especially valuable!

Robj98168 said...

e- that is true about using peat. We must use it wisely and sparingly

ib mommy- Good thought about donating the pots to the master gardeners. I will check into that for my area!

Heather- I have had good luck with my bonnie plants- yup I am gonna start making my own pots too!

Tara- good for you! More people need to think of that! BUt I am afraid for every pot kept and reused, there are probably at least four simply tossed in the garbage

Abbie- I will have to google poo pots. Thanks for the tips about donating used pots to schools/ I worked in the school system. I should know these things!

Sid said...

I know from an experience that Bonnie Plants Products are Top Notch. I like the rest of you have researched the use of the "Peat Pot". From my findings the peat bogs are a renewable resource. It takes a good time to regenerate the peat but there is an abundance of peat all across the world. Also they are available nationwide at all of the big box stores and several mom and pop places.